Poems to share

Paradise Lost, Book I, Lines 254-263

The mind is its own place, and in it self
Can make a Heav’n of Hell, a Hell of Heav’n.
What matter where, if I be still the same,
And what I should be, all but less then hee
Whom Thunder hath made greater? Here at least
We shall be free; th’ Almighty hath not built
Here for his envy, will not drive us hence:
Here we may reign secure, and in my choyce
To reign is worth ambition though in Hell:
Better to reign in Hell, then serve in Heav’n.

John Milton

John Milton (1608 – 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem 'Paradise Lost' (1667), written in blank verse (iambic pentameter without rhymes). In his 1674 edition, Milton added an introduction defending his choice not to use rhyme, 'Rime being no necessary Adjunct or true Ornament of Poem or good Verse'.